Enemies of Peace by M.K. Williams

Introducing Enemies of Peace, the thrilling new book by M.K. Williams.

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Enemies of Peace literally starts with a bang: an explosion captured by two teenage girls of a house engulphed in flames. In the summer that lead up to the explosion, the Hydroline Corporation hired Timothy Lawson and his firm to represent them in a class-action lawsuit. While juggling his caseload, he and his wife Cynthia decide to buy their first house. It should have been the happiest summer of their lives. Nevertheless, their date with death was looming. 

Who could have possibly done it? Could it be the corporation that Timothy was defending, did he uncover one secret too many? Could it be the cousin that Cynthia has forbidden Timothy to talk with anymore? Could it be the other man who is in love with Cynthia, his jealous rage driving him to kill? Or, could it be the quiet neighbors next door, the unsuspecting extremists living in American suburban splendor?

Enemies of Peace will be released on November 9th 2017. You can read Williams’ Ask The Author interview here.

img_3695MK Williams is an Indiana-born, Philadelphia-raised, Florida-transplant working and living beneath the sunny, and often rainy, skies of Tampa. Williams’ writing influences include a lifetime of watching suspenseful mysteries and action movies and reading Stephen King, Ian McEwan and J.K. Rowling.

 

Goodreads | Amazon UK

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Remember, remember, the 5th of November: Weltanschauung turns 1!

On the 5th of November, Weltanschauung will turn 1. To celebrate, I’m giving away 3 signed copies of my short story collection.

41mh26eZQyL._UY250_The harbinger, the oddball, the remaining twin… Weltanschauung seeks to open your eyes to different stories, set in different worlds and at different times, but with the same theme in mind: to make you question your worldview.

This collection of short stories traverses genres, introduces a variety of characters, and shines a light on some of our deepest fears.

Challenge your perceptions.

You can enter to win a signed copy on Goodreads. Don’t forget to join me on Facebook, and let me know what you think!

Jessica Bayliss jumps on The Bandwagon to talk about improving your writing

bayliss-new-3-5_1Jessica Bayliss is a fiction author with a Ph.D. in clinical psychology who loves all things reading and writing. Her work crosses genres including romance, urban fantasy, and horror. Although it’s typically advisable to focus on one audience, Jessica just can’t seem to settle down; she writes Middle Grade, Young Adult, New Adult and (eh hem) regular adult fiction. She is a member of the Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

Because one cannot live on writing alone, Jessica also spends a great deal of time with friends and family. She is a lover of all animals especially one very special Havanese and one extremely ornery cockatiel. She also loves to cook, eat, and exercise (it’s all about balance, right?) and is a firm believer that coffee makes the world a better place.

Jessica is available for Skype Visits, Workshops, and talks about her books, writing, and related to her PsychWRITE workshops and webinars.

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Today I want to talk about the fluidity of books and stories. This notion has been on my mind a lot for a few different reasons. Number one, I’ve been working on revisions of my own books, and I’m a Pitch Wars mentor, so revision is on my mind in general. But I’ve also been doing reading for critique partners, and it’s not uncommon to find little inconsistencies in books that are undergoing revision, which are often holdovers from previous drafts. So, a CP may say something like, “Oh, in the last draft, the character named Bessie was actually the MC’s best friend, but my editor said I needed a little more tension so we turned Bessie into a robot shark.” Okay, maybe I’ve never heard that exact line, but you get the point.

When I think about some of my books, and some I’ve read for friends, and then think about the way these books used to be, I’m often blown away by how different the finished product is from the original.

We can also flip this around. Next time you start a new book, try asking yourself: What was this book like in its first draft? And think about all the things that might have been different. Unless the book was written by a friend (or unless the author discloses details of their revision process), we will never know. But one thing I am certain of is that every book we purchase—whether from our local indie bookstore or downloaded to our e-reader—was very different in its earliest iteration.

I use that word deliberately: iteration. Because plotting and character development are iterative processes. I think about my own revisions on my debut novel, TEN AFTER CLOSING, or the one I just sent off to my editor—a book that I revised quite a bit on my own, then re-revised for my agent. If my editor decides she wants it, I’m sure I’ll do even more revision. Both of these books have had huge changes; it’s actually hard to wrap my brain around that, especially because I (naturally) thought they were both perfect before the changes (LOL!).

If you’ve read any of my blog posts, particularly my It’s a Writer Thing blog series, you know that I believe practice is the single most important thing we can do to be successful.

So, for me, practicing that process of major revisions, literally re-imagining big chunks of my books, has been an incredible learning experience. It’s taught me to be flexible. It’s taught me that new versions of my manuscript can feel just as right—more right even—than the original version. I’ve learned things about myself too: I know that changing something I love won’t kill me. I know I can get through and come out the other end feeling even better than ever about the MS. And I know it’s like this for other writers because they’re telling me about their own revision whirlwinds all the time.

Until the day the book goes to print, it’s a fluid entity, a shapeshifter without a true face. It can be anything.

So, here’s one weird tip. Take a book you’ve written (or a short story, or even a scene), and now rewrite it in an entirely different way. I know, that sounds crazy. You worked hard on that book and you probably love it; I know I loved mine. But try it. You don’t have to keep the new version. Just try rewriting it and pretending you’re going for an entirely different feel or different genre or just a different emotional dynamic in a particular scene. Put your all into it—pretend it’s for realz—and then see how you feel about the new version.

Perhaps you’ll still love your original more. Even if you do, you might find yourself getting totally wrapped up in this new imagining of your tale. You might discover all sorts of new ideas, exciting ones. Maybe you’ll never use them (or maybe a couple will find their way in the book in the end). Regardless of which draft you prefer, you will definitely see the stories in a new light. Gone will be the false belief that books and stories are static, that there is one way to tell this tale. And, hopefully, one day when you get revisions from your agent or your editor, you’ll know that you can make any changes they ask for and love them. Because you practiced it already.

Introducing: The Triangle by Nakisanze Segawa

Contributing author of Crossroads, Nakisanze Segawa is a Ugandan writer and performance poet. She is also a contributor to Global Press Journal, and to the Daily Monitor newspaper in Kampala. The Triangle is her first novel.

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It is a time of upheaval in the African nation of Buganda. Missionaries are rapidly converting people to Christianity, undermining the authority of their king and sewing discord among his people. Three characters – Nagawa, a young but unhappy bride to the king; Kalinda, a servant in the royal courts; and Reverend Clement, a Scottish priest – are swept up in forces that will change their lives and reshape the future of their nation.

While African history often has been told by Westerners rather than Africans themselves, Ugandan writer Nakisanze Segawa offers an African perspective. Her meticulously researched novel examines a critical moment in Ugandan history, and offers a surprising and fresh perspective on Africa in the days just before colonialism.

For more information, or for bloggers to request a review copy, email nagawakalinda@gmail.com.

The Triangle is available to buy in paperback and as an ebook on Smashwords.

Weltanschauung: Price drop!

My short story collection, Weltanschauung, has recently been reduced in price!

Paperback: £6 | $7€6.42

ebook: £3$3.86 | €2.99

Also available on Kindle Unlimited.

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The harbinger, the oddball, the remaining twin… Weltanschauung seeks to open your eyes to different stories, set in different worlds and at different times, but with the same theme in mind: to make you question your worldview.

This collection of short stories traverses genres, introduces a variety of characters, and shines a light on some of our deepest fears.

Challenge your perceptions.

 

 

 

Grab your copy now. Let me know what you think on Goodreads!

Guest Blog: Book secrets you didn’t know by Taryn Leigh

Author Taryn Leigh jumps on The Bandwagon to reveal secrets you didn’t know about your favourite books.

Taryn Leigh is a South African born citizen, who spent her childhood with her nose buried in books. Her love for reading transpired into her ambition to become a writer. She first tried her hand at blogging, which eventually led to her writing her first novel. She lives in Pretoria, with her husband, son, and two cocker spaniels.

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Secrets of Thirteen Reasons Why

Not every character in the series is in the book.

When the writers brought the 288-page book to life as a 13-hour series, they had to expand the world of the story with new characters.

“I think of the book as this outline of Hannah’s story, and then from that, the writers of the series — with Jay’s blessing — added so many details and plots that allow the viewer to unpack the story to a greater extent,” Hannah said. “The new characters help out flesh out this world.”

Her character Stephanie is among the new additions, which meant Hannah was acting from a clean slate. She’s one of Courtney’s best friends and “a ditzy take on the typical mean girl,” Hannah explained. “When I got the breakdown for this character, it was funny because the script just said, ‘Stephanie (pretty, dumb.)’.”

Read more from the source here.

 

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Secrets of Perfect Imperfections by Taryn Leigh

“Edward’s character in the book is actually inspired by my real life husband. Also the mention of Wuthering Heights in the book is a hint towards my husband, as Wuthering Heights is the very first book he gave me when we had just started dating.

One day we were walking in a flea market, and he picked up a used copy of Wuthering Heights sold by a book merchant, and bought it for me. He then took me to the park, and sat playing with my hair as I read the first few chapters. He won my heart that day!”

 

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Secrets of JK Rowling, Author of Harry Potter

JK Rowling finds ways to bring elements of herself into her books.

She and Harry Potter share a birthday, July 31st. She is reported as saying that Hermione is a bit like her when she was younger, and her favourite animal is an otter—which is, of course, Hermione’s patronus. Plus, both Dumbledore and Rowling like sherbet lemons (Rowling said that the wizard’s “got good taste”).

Read more from the source here.

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Secrets of Karen Swan, Author of Christmas at Tiffany’s

Karen Swans real name is Karen Anne Swan MacLeod.

Much as she loves her very Scottish name, Swan had to drop the MacLeod when she started writing blockbuster fiction since the shorter name suited the flamboyantly embossed covers of her saucy books.

“I’d always written as a journalist as Karen Swan MacLeod. Dad’s family name is actually MacSwan MacLeod, so we’re very Scottish. I think Karen Swan sounds like a made-up name for someone who writes sexy, romantic novels.”

Read more from the source here.

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About Perfect Imperfections

Sarah Lewis desires nothing more than to begin again after a failed marriage and a tragedy so terrifying, it forces her to leave her life in London to stay with her best friend a world apart in South Africa.

Despite immediate success in her business, she struggles to understand who she really is and where she belongs in the world. So begins a journey of discovery as Sarah re-unites with Katy in the land where she was born, where the air is lavender scented, and weekends are spent cycling on the beach.

Until the day when she has to return to London to face the ghosts of her past and confront a situation that has grown more complicated in her absence.

Perfect Imperfections is an intriguing tale which hints at wrongdoings and deceit without giving too much away. The author cleverly weaves a tale around fragile yet strong Sarah as she tries to reconcile her past with her future, engaging the reader to the point where we simply want the best for her and for happiness finally to come her way.

Find Taryn Leigh on social media

Facebook: @PerfectImperfectionsTarynLeigh

Twitter: @tarynleighbook

Instagram: @tarynleighbooks

Website: https://olympiapublishers.com/books/perfect-imperfections

Ask The Author: Patricia Bossano

Award-winning author Patricia Bossano grew up in Ecuador, South America and moved to the United States in the mid 1980’s to pursue a career in International Sales, as well as work as a translator, interpreter and instructor in Spanish.

PBossano_HeadshotOver the years, writing continued to be Patricia’s main passion whether journaling, writing letters, short stories, and eventually, composing full-length novels.  Patricia published the first of the Fairie books in 2009, starting with Faery Sight (winner of the 2010 Golden Quill Award of Excellence from the League of Utah Writers), followed by Cradle Gift in 2009. In 2016, Patricia left the corporate world to follow her dream of being a full-time writer, allowing her to complete the third installation of the Faerie Series with the 2017 release of Nahia. The trilogy chronicles the history of a matriarchal faery family and serves as “a celebration of the relationships between mothers, daughters and sisters” within Patricia’s family.   Patricia is a full-time writer residing in Southern California.

What inspired you to start writing?

As far back as I can remember, I’ve had issues with excessive blushing. Even though I thought I had a lot to say, speaking in front of my classmates turned me into a Gossamer lookalike—you know, the hairy red monster on Bugs Bunny and various other Looney Tunes shows. I’d heat up until my chest and face were covered in red blotches and everyone would point, laugh, and ask “why”, which only added to my anxiety.

Around the time I was in the 4th grade, a light went on for me about the importance of language, and that’s when my affinity with the written word began to unfold. Inspired by a desire to communicate without becoming a blotchy, uncomfortable, bright-red mess, I began writing in journals and in letters to my family when I was in elementary school. By the time I was a teenager, I had moved on to write short stories and essays, after which I began tackling full-length novels in my twenties.

What do you wish you’d known about the publishing process?

Whether you go the traditional route or independent, the publishing process is an overall complex industry filled with limitations and flexibility. What I hadn’t known or expected was that becoming a published writer would make me confront my fears on a daily basis, force me to define my dreams, and challenge me not just to believe in them, but to also follow through with making those dreams come true.

The publishing process is the daily battle of the spiritual warrior, and although I might lose a battle here and there, I’m aiming to win the war by creating a body of work that—in the end—reflects my overall transformation in style, language, experience, and personal growth throughout the various stages of my life.

Tell us more about your book.

My Faerie Trilogy chronicles the lives of key matriarchs in a hybrid (faery-human) family. Nahia is the third installment in the series, and it is the story of a rebellious faery princess who struggles with satisfying her own desires over what’s best for her loved ones.

Following her heart in pursuit of the human she loves, Nahia hides her true identity as a faery in order to enter the human dimension. After giving birth to a daughter, Nahia’s true identity is revealed, as is the realization that she has forever altered the genetic human footprint. Faced with death, Nahia returns to the faery realm only to have its weight thrust upon her. In the aftermath of the vicious attack that made her an orphan and deprived them of the magical Keeper of the Forest, the faerie realm enters a dormant state.

To save her home and renew ties with both her human and faerie family, Nahia finds a way to reawaken the realm, become the new Faery Queen, and provide a royal descendant for the new Keeper of the Forest.

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What advice would you give to aspiring writers?

Plan: Out of respect for the reader, I begin a new project with three paragraphs detailing the beginning, middle, and ending of the novel. From there, I outline each chapter, establishing the structure of the book while looking for timeline issues or plot gaps. When I feel comfortable with the flow, I begin fleshing out the chapters.

Prioritize: Create a reasonable work timeline and stick to it out of respect for your craft and for the people you love. Respect your writing hours so the people who love you will too, and give them the assurance that when your daily writing hours are finished, your time is theirs.

Persist: Give it your best and never give up on your dreams.

What are you currently working on?

I’m currently gathering information and interviewing family members for my grandpa’s biography, which I’m thinking of writing from my grandmother’s point of view (to keep to the matriarchal theme). I’m also evaluating the next steps for my publishing imprint, WaterBearer Press, whose initial projects include a collection of ghost/paranormal stories, and other works by talented merry faeries in my family.

What are you reading right now?

I must confess, during these weeks leading up to the launch of Nahia on June 20th, I’ve been re-reading the entire trilogy from start to finish! But the next book I plan to read once my nerves settle down is Anne Rice’s, Prince Lestat and the Realms of Atlantis.

Nahia will be released on June 20th 2017, and the rest of the trilogy is available on Amazon now.

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