Introducing: Powerful – Tome 1: The Realm of Harcilor by S. N. Lemoing

The Bandwagon introduces indie author S.N. Lemoing, a fresh feminist voice in the fantasy world.

From the author:

“Several years ago, I wrote this novel to bring some subjects to the fore, such as diverse and powerful female characters, ecology, different families (single parents, large families, poor and rich backgrounds), and diversity of body types. The characters are never totally as they seem to be. The reader can feel a lot of emotions; the story is like a roller-coaster.

About the characters, we have ingenious children and teenagers, a biracial rebel princess and a maimed female warrior, among others. Politics, treason, magical powers, epic battle scenes, a little bit of romance – these are the themes you can find in this story.”

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For twelve years, the power has been usurped at the Realm of Harcilor. Cyr, an erudite, and his adopted son, Kaaz, have formed a secret school.

Indeed, in this world, some people were born endowed with magical abilities: the Silarens.

However, it is not that easy to detect your own powers. They will soon be joined by a mysterious young woman who will provide them with valuable information.

When Litar – the most powerful being of the realm – goes away for two months, they finally foresee the opportunity to act.

Can they win their freedom back? Will they make the right choices?

Grab your copy on Amazon now, or find it on Goodreads. You can keep up to date with the latest book news on the Facebook page.

About The Author

S. N. Lemoing was born in 1987 near Paris, France. S N Lemoing

She graduated in Cinematography and English, studied philosophy, literature and lately, at University, she had the chance to follow classes about the Image of Women in the Media as well as the Female Gaze: Women directors. She then worked as a PA for films and TV, and also wrote, directed and produced episodes for 3 webseries and short films.

The will to write without boundaries led her to become an independent author. Her first novel is POWERFUL – T1: The Realm of Harcilor, a fantasy novel acclaimed by more than 85 French literary bloggers.

Her second book is a sassy chick-lit ‘Mes 7 ex’ (My seven exes), and the 3rd one ‘SHEWOLF’, urban fantasy genre, has been read by 1200+ readers and stayed on the Amazon’s Supernatural top 15 for 5 months.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr 

The Handmaid’s Tale: Heart of glass

The Handmaid’s Tale hit our screens in the UK on Channel 4 three weeks ago, several weeks behind the US.

Please note, there will be spoilers for the first three episodes below. Proceed with caution.

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In Gilead, women are ranked on how useful they are to society. If they’re fertile, they become a Handmaid, subjected to rape by their Commander, and expected to bear children. Written in 1985, this story is still harshly poignant. The TV show takes this story even further, bringing it into the present day, and showing just how close we are to such a world.

Last week, viewers were shocked by the harsh storylines. Ofglen, a lesbian, was considered a gender traitor, and, since she’s still fertile, was allowed to live. But she was subjected to a horror that women and girls still face today – FGM. I’ve seen complaints about the violence depicted in The Handmaid’s Tale, but let me tell you this – the violence brought against women every day is very real, and, in order to do it justice, it must be shown.

Everything about The Handmaid’s Tale is real. It may be a story, but author Margaret Atwood claims that she didn’t make anything up – everything she wrote about had happened to women at some point in history. And I can believe it.

In episode 3, we also discover the slow disintegration of society, and the removal of women’s rights. Offred describes it perfectly: “Nothing changes instantaneously. In a gradually heating bathtub, you’d be boiled to death before you knew it”. The women lost access to their money, their jobs – their freedom. Joan – Offred’s pre-Gilead name – and her friend Moira attend a protest, where the army opens fire, killing civilians. They show Joan, Moira, and Luke, Joan’s husband, in their home, discussing what had happened. “I’ll look after you,” Luke says, and every female viewer clenches their fists. That’s not the point, Luke.

Moira explodes at Luke, calling him part of the problem. This scene shines a light on the microaggressions women have to deal with every day, dealing with men who, thinking they’re helping, are actually contributing to the problem.

The music accompanying the fallout of the protest is Heart of Glass by Blondie, the Crabtree Remix. It’s slower, darker, haunting. Every episode so far has left me reeling. My fists are tight balls throughout each episode, my jaw clenched. Tears are barely held back. Because this is reality, not some dystopian fiction. The Handmaid’s Tale isn’t just some TV show to entertain the masses on a Sunday evening. It’s so much more than that – it’s our lives.

Women’s Equality Party hails results of its first general election

The Women’s Equality Party (WE) this morning hailed the results of its first ever Westminster elections as a stunning vindication of its founding principles of collaborative politics, progressive values and the need to fundamentally reimagine the democratic process.

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“When we started the party, we said ‘voters don’t want politics as usual’,” said party co-founder and president Catherine Mayer. “We also pointed to a consensus for progressive values that traversed party boundaries yet was constantly stymied by old-style partisan politics. If this election has proved anything, it is the scale of the appetite for those values and for a new politics.”

“The outcome of this election—a hung Parliament—means any parties seeking to implement the mandate for those values will now have to follow our lead and focus on finding ways to work together.”

The Women’s Equality Party also celebrated the extraordinary achievements of its seven general election candidates, who changed the conversation and raised the game, forcing gender equality on to centre stage.

“These brilliant women, none of whom had any history of political involvement, show individually and collectively how much better politics would be if it drew on all the talent available, rather than remaining a white man’s club,” said Mayer. “During the campaign I saw Sophie Walker’s opponents complaining she was ‘too good’. I heard Harini Iyengar tipped as a future Prime Minister. Just yesterday a young Asian woman came up to tell me how thrilled she had been to vote for Nimco Ali. It was amazing, she said, to be able to vote with 100 per cent enthusiasm. All of our candidates have drawn many, many responses like this.”

WE party leader Sophie Walker led the charge nationally and in Shipley against Conservative Philip Davies, whose 10,000-vote majority had been deemed by Labour to be unassailable. WE’s ground campaign lit a fire under the Shipley contest, prompting a surge in progressive votes that came close to unseating Davies, a notorious anti-feminist.

“I entered this race because Shipley and the UK deserve so much better than Philip Davies,” said Sophie Walker. “Our campaign galvanised the progressive response to Davies—and also showed the potential of progressive alliance. We are proud to have led the way with the Green Party, who stood down their candidate to campaign alongside us.”

The campaign showed how much WE can achieve, but it also highlighted the urgent need for electoral reform—and for the Women’s Equality Party. The first-past-the-post system has been proven globally to exclude women and minorities. It also encourages progressives to fight each other. It is also a system that demands huge resources and is unnecessarily expensive, issues that become even more acute for smaller parties in a snap election. For all of these reasons, WE advocates for a fairer proportional system.

The iniquities of the electoral system are compounded by broadcasting guidelines, meant to ensure impartiality during elections, that instead skews the system further by putting more weight on past electoral performance than the current level of membership. “This is why UKIP was splattered all over the nation’s TV screens, while the Women’s Equality Party and the Greens could barely get a look-in,” says Catherine Mayer. “Print media followed broadcast’s lead on this, and in misrepresenting the election as a contest between the two biggest parties instead of what it was, a contest between competing regressive and progressive values.”

Some media coverage did acknowledge the impact of the Women’s Equality Party and the importance of the WE manifesto. “Their prospectus did make me wonder how much more women could be valued in our society if all parties had the imagination to think this differently and comprehensively,” wrote ITV economics editor Noreena Hertz. Zoe Williams in the Guardian praised the manifesto as “an extraordinary document” and the party for “doing the painstaking graft of reimagining all politics through the lens of equality”.

But the story about the Women’s Equality Party that made the biggest headlines, on the eve of election day, underscored the reason for the party’s existence. Female staff working at the party’s London headquarters in the evening received multiple abusive phone calls from a number of men, one of whom said he was coming to the office and that they should be scared. Nimco Ali, WE candidate for Hornsey & Wood Green, received a letter full of racial and Islamophobic abuse and signed “Jo Cox”, the name of the female MP brutally murdered in 2016.

“Two of the Women’s Equality Party’s core objectives are an end to violence against women and girls and equal representation. The fact that people tried to intimidate us and stop our campaign shows how urgent those objectives are,” said Catherine Mayer.

Editors’ notes

The Women’s Equality Party contested seven seats in the general election:

  • Shipley: Sophie Walker won 1040 votes = 1.9% of vote share

  • Tunbridge Wells: Celine Thomas won 702 votes = 1.3% of vote share

  • Vauxhall: Harini Iyengar won 539 votes = 1% of vote share

  • Hornsey & Wood Green: Nimco Ali won 551 votes = 0.9% of vote share

  • Stirling: Kirstein Rummery won 337 votes  = 0.7%

  • Manchester Withington: Sally Carr won 234 votes = 0.4% of vote share

  • Vale of Glamorgan: Sharon Lovell won 177 votes = 0.3% of vote share

The Women’s Equality Party was established to highlight and dismantle obstacles to gender equality in the UK: a political and economic architecture rigged against women and diversity, an education system riven with unconscious bias and gender stereotyping, a media that reinforces these stereotypes, a society that assigns little value to caregiving and therefore assumes it to be women’s business, that underpays women and invests less in women’s health and permits endemic harassment and violence against women.

The Party currently has 65,000 members and registered supporters. It aims to put equality for women at the top of the national political agenda by being an electoral force that also works with other political parties; in addition to party membership it also offers joint memberships to members of other political parties.

Press enquiries to Catherine Riley, Head of Communications (catherine.riley@womensequality.org.uk/ +447764 752 731).

Press at Women’s Equality Party

http://www.womensequality.org.uk/

General Election 2017: The future is female

In about 5 hours, the polling stations will close, and the first constituencies will start to declare. Will it be Labour? Will it be Tory? Or will the country be divided once again? The polls have been all over the place, the bookies unsure, but what I do know is this: more women are getting involved than ever before.

Back in May, I wrote about the importance of politics, of voting, and the history of women’s suffrage. I wrote about how women almost have a duty to vote, to pay respect to the women who came before them. Women under 30 are the least likely to vote, according to #SHEvotes, a statistic I can only face with utter horror. But are women less likely to vote because they’re less likely to feel represented within politics? There may be something to that. Thankfully, more and more women are getting stuck in, carving a path for young women to pursue a career in politics.

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The Telegraph

The Women’s Equality Party is, of course, in the lead, with all of their candidates being women, and Labour is second with an almost equal 40%. The Green Party and SNP follow close behind – and with Nicola Sturgeon at the helm in Scotland, I dare any woman to not be inspired.

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“Politics aside – I hope girls everywhere look at this photograph, and believe nothing should be off limits for them.” – Nicola Sturgeon, Twitter

Our current Prime Minister is a woman, yes, but she is also a Tory, and she, like Thatcher (and other British female leaders), is not interested in pushing for equality. But Sturgeon is right. While May and her Tory government may stand for everything I hate, I’m still proud to be able to say that we have had two female leaders. And with more women getting involved, who knows where politics is going? I want to see an equally split cabinet, I want to be represented in Parliament, I want issues specific to women being addressed. And I want to see women succeeding.

I almost ran in my local election last month. I would have been another woman standing for the Women’s Equality Party, but I decided against it, for multiple reasons. But having the chance, the option, the opportunity, to stand as an MP and represent the women of the country, is an opportunity I’m thrilled to have, and I will never forget the hardships women faced in order for me to have it.

We have had less than 100 years of all women being able to vote. Although I’m waiting with baited breath to hear the result of the election, I’m also interested in how many women voted this year – and how many young people. Since Brexit, more young people have been taking notice of politics, getting involved with discussions on social media. And why not – it’s our future, after all. Let’s fight for it.

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Did you vote? How are you hoping it will go? Let me know in the comments!

General Election 2017: Politics is for the young

Last month, Theresa May called for a snap general election, to be held on the 8th of June 2017.

Since the EU referendum, I’ve seen more and more young people taking an interest in politics. How refreshing to see the younger generations (myself included) getting involved and hashing out the pros and cons – and attempting to separate fact from fiction – on social media.

Votes for women

Every time there’s an election, I bang on about how women fought, suffered, and died for our right to vote. But it’s still incredibly important that we remember what they went through, just so we could have our voices heard. Do you know how these women were treated? We’ve all heard snippets of history, but the full story is much more horrific. Named the Cat and Mouse Act, the government treated them like playthings, and treated them horrendously.

Another thing that is less known is that there were two groups – Suffragists and Suffragettes. Put simply, the Suffragists (led by Millicent Fawcett) wanted to campaign for the vote peacefully, while the Suffragettes (led by Emmeline Pankhurst) were open to more militant ways. Both groups were made up of middle class women, and the movement also campaigned for other rights, such as “the right to divorce a husband, the right to education, and the right to have a job such as a doctor” – all things we take for granted now, although true equality has not yet been achieved. In 1914, Sylvia Pankhurst formed a third group for working class women, rejecting the violence of the Suffragettes, and, in 1918, female householders over the age of 30 got the vote – but women over 21 got the vote in 1928.

We have had less than 100 years of women voting, and already, so many (too many) women have forgotten the fight, the struggle, for them to have a vote they do not use.

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In England, we have had two female prime ministers. Although I wouldn’t call Thatcher or May feminist heroines, they are still women among a sea of men. Politics is still a male-dominated area, driven by white, rich men, with old families and plenty of influence. But more women are getting involved – the Women’s Equality Party is one fine example. Nicola Sturgeon of the Scottish National Party is a strong, admirable woman. The Green Party has more female politicians. If women are not in power, the women of the country will not benefit. Representation is vital to securing the rights of women, the rights of our daughters and granddaughters.

How to vote

First of all, you have to make sure you’re registered to vote. It only takes a few minutes, and you have until the 22nd of May to register for the general election in June. Once you’re registered, you should receive a confirmation letter, and you will probably receive a polling card in the post, but you don’t need these to vote. You simply have to turn up.

At the polling station

Your local polling station will probably be in a community centre or church in your area – there are always polling stations dotted around, to make it easier for people to vote. Once there, a table of people will ask for your address and name, and they’ll cross you off the list. You’ll be handed a slip of paper, and be directed to one of the booths. You put a cross next to the person/party you wish to vote for, fold the slip, and pop it in a box kept close by. And that’s it!

But who do I vote for?

It’s difficult to know who you should vote for, particularly at a time where the country is so divided. You can join this discussion group on Facebook, where like-minded people gather to discuss the best tactics in order to reach the desired outcome – no more Tories.

The easiest way to decide on a party is to think about what’s important to you. This quiz and others like it can help, but I’d also recommend getting your value straight in your head before attempting to choose a party. Here’s what I care about, in a nutshell:

  • Women’s rights and equality, including, but not limited to, access to abortion, free contraception, justice for victims of rape and sexual assault… simply, equality in all things
  • Free, decent healthcare for all
  • Free education for all
  • Marriage and civil partnership equality – for opposite sex couples as well as same sex
  • National living wage for all
  • Decent, honest sex education
  • Closing the pay gap and destroying the glass ceiling
  • Benefits for those in need
  • Affordable housing
  • Controls to be put on landlords and big corporations
  • Right to free speech and media
  • Lower the unemployment rate
  • Remaining in the EU, or having another referendum, if possible, or at least striking a good deal for all involved

I suppose you could say I’m fairly liberal. My values align very well with the Women’s Equality Party, of which I’m a member, and the Green Party, for whom I voted in the last general election.

Tactical voting

This year, I’ll be voting tactically. As I mentioned before, I’m of the “anyone but the Tories” mindset, and Labour is the only party that currently has a chance of pushing them out. (Our “first past the post” electoral system is warped and unfair, but that’s a discussion for another day.) If you’re simply worried about the impact of the Tories on your future, your country, voting Labour is a good way to go.

And remember – we vote for the party, not the person, so if you’re not a fan of Corbyn (and I have to admit, I’m not his biggest fan), but you like Labour’s policies, and would prefer them to the Tories, vote for them. Prime ministers are bound to their cabinet and the rest of Parliament, they are not (contrary to popular belief) mere tyrants, one person ruling over the nation. Our government is made up of a mixture of people and departments, it’s complex, and, for the most part, works. Put your faith in the system, if you can, and use your vote to help make a difference.

Your vote counts – I promise

Another blogger shared a post about her experience with politics, and how she came a bit late to the party. Take a look at this:

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If every single person who did not vote, chose to vote for one party or another, their votes would make a difference. It’s easy to get disheartened, but it’s our duty and our right to have a say in the running of our country, and voting is one of the best ways to have your voice heard. Mobilise those around you, if you can, to take the time to vote on June the 8th. I can’t predict the outcome, but the more people who vote, the more voices there are to take into account. And, for that, I have hope.

Women’s Equality Party to contest seats in London, Manchester and Cardiff

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The Women’s Equality Party announced yesterday that four more candidates who will contest seats in the snap General Election on 8 June.

In London, Nimco Ali will stand in Hornsey and Wood Green and Harini Iyengar will stand in Vauxhall. Sharon Lovell will contest the Wales seat of Cardiff South and Penarth, while Sally Carr MBE will stand in the constituency of Manchester Withington.

“These brilliant women represent the diverse, creative voices of the Women’s Equality Party and I am delighted to announce their candidacy,” said Party Leader Sophie Walker. “This election they will speed change, by campaigning for equality, justice and tolerance across the UK as part of the national conversation about the general election.”

Nimco Ali is a British Somali feminist and social activist. She is co-founder and director of Daughters of Eve, a survivor-led organisation which has helped to transform the approach to ending female genital mutilation (FGM).

Harini Iyengar is ranked as a leading barrister in Employment, Equality and Education, gave expert legal evidence to the House of Commons Inquiry into high heels and workplace dress codes, and has been described by the Times as “a leading campaigner for diversity in the legal profession.”

Sally Carr is former Principal Programme Manager for Young People’s Health at Manchester PCT, Deputy Head of Service at Halton Youth Service and Operational Director at The Proud Trust. In 2012 she was awarded an MBE for her services to young people, recognising in particular her work with LGBT+ youth.

Sharon Lovell, the first woman in her family to go to university and gain a degree, is a Director for Nyas, a UK charity providing information, advice, advocacy and legal representation to children, young people and vulnerable adults.

Walker said that each candidate would be fighting to win in their respective constituency, but would also be pressuring their rivals to take on their policies. “The new parties understand that the electorate are tired of combative, tribal politics. Along with the Green Party, who have endorsed my campaign in Shipley, and the Liberal Democrats who are forging strategic alliances in key seats across the UK, WE are part of a new political landscape that will deliver a shot in the arm to our country by working collaboratively and sharing ideas.”

She added: “We know we are outsiders, but in spite of the huge disadvantages of our first-past-the-post system, and the vast expense of campaigning, the Women’s Equality Party is set to make its mark on this election.”

The Women’s Equality Party will announce further candidates next week.

Editor’s notes

The Women’s Equality Party have announced the following candidates:

Sophie Walker, Shipley

Sophie Walker is the leader of the Women’s Equality Party. She worked as an international news agency journalist for nearly twenty years and is an ambassador for the National Autistic Society, campaigning for better support and understanding of autism, particularly in women and girls. Sophie was elected leader of the Women’s Equality Party in July 2015, and in January 2016 was selected to represent the party in the London Mayoral election. She garnered one in twenty of the votes cast for Mayor in London on 5 May.

Nimco Ali, Hornsey and Wood Green

Nimco is a British Somali feminist and social activist. She is co-founder and director of Daughters of Eve, a survivor-led organisation which has helped to transform the approach to ending female genital mutilation (FGM). Nimco formerly worked on ‘The Girl Generation: Together to End FGM’ campaign, which celebrates the Africa-led movement to end FGM in one generation. Currently she is an ambassador for #MAKERSUK. MAKERS is AOL’s women’s leadership platform that highlights the stories of ground-breaking women today to create the leaders of tomorrow. In 2014, she was awarded Red Magazine’s Woman of the Year award, and also placed at No 6 on the Woman’s Hour Power List. Most recently she was named by The Sunday Times as one of Debrett’s 500 most influential people in Britain, and as one of the Evening Standard’s 1000 most powerful. Nimco is a trustee for Women for Refugee Women and the Emma Humphreys Memorial Prize and is a founding member and Steering Committee member of the Women’s Equality Party.

Harini Iyengar, Vauxhall

Harini Iyengar grew up in Manchester, where her immigrant parents were both NHS doctors.  She went to Manchester High School for Girls, where all the Pankhurst daughters were educated, as was WEP co-founder Catherine Mayer. She studied at Oxford University before moving to London, where she was called to the Bar in 1999.  She is ranked as a leading barrister in Employment, Equality and Education, gave expert legal evidence to the House of Commons Inquiry into high heels and workplace dress codes, and has been described by the Times as “a leading campaigner for diversity in the legal profession”.  She works full-time and raises three children as their lone parent.  Harini stood for the Women’s Equality Party in the Greater London Assembly elections in May 2016, and at their first party conference in November 2016 she was elected to Policy Committee as Spokesperson on Equal Representation.

Sally Carr MBE, Manchester Withington

Sally completed her certificate in Youth and Community work at Manchester Polytechnic in 1989 and returned to MMU in 2000 to do her BA Hons in Youth and Community work.

She has worked in various roles including Principal Programme Manager for Young People’s Health at Manchester PCT, Deputy Head of Service at Halton Youth Service and Operational Director at The Proud Trust. In 2012 she was awarded an MBE for her services to young people, recognising in particular her work with LGBT+ youth.

Sharon Lovell, Cardiff South and Penarth

Sharon was born in Wales and raised, along with her two siblings, by her working mum. She was the first woman in her family to go to university and gain a degree. She is passionate about empowering women to have opportunities and access to help shape the future of Wales. Having lived and worked in Wales all her life, she is now Director for Nyas, a UK charity providing information, advice, advocacy and legal representation to children, young people and vulnerable adults. Sharon, who lives in Newport, stood for the Women’s Equality Party in the Welsh Assembly elections in May 2016.

The Women’s Equality Party was established two years ago to highlight and dismantle obstacles to gender equality in the UK: a political and economic architecture rigged against women and diversity, an education system riven with unconscious bias and gender stereotyping, a media that reinforces these stereotypes, a society that assigns little value to caregiving and therefore assumes it to be women’s business, that underpays women and invests less in women’s health and permits endemic harassment and violence against women.

In May 2016 the party won 350,000 votes in elections across Scotland, Wales and London.

The Party is currently contesting the Liverpool Metro Mayor election and local elections in Sheffield, Tunbridge Wells, South Wales and Worcester.

The Party currently has 65,000 members and registered supporters. It aims to put equality for women at the top of the national political agenda by being an electoral force that also works with other political parties; in addition to party membership it also offers joint memberships to members of other political parties.

Press enquiries to Catherine Riley, Head of Communications (catherine.riley@womensequality.org.uk/ +447764 752 731).

Press at Women’s Equality Party

http://www.womensequality.org.uk/

Green Party votes to endorse Women’s Equality Party in Shipley

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The Bradford Green Party yesterday voted by 80 percent in favour to endorse Sophie Walker’s candidacy in Shipley, calling for a progressive alliance to oust Conservative MP Philip Davies. The local Liberal Democrat party is currently in discussion about whether to also step aside and Labour is yet to select a candidate.

“I am delighted that the local Green Party has taken the brave decision to put people before party politics and I am deeply honoured that they have chosen to go the extra step with an endorsement of my candidacy,” said Walker. “Together we will be campaigning on a progressive ticket to get the best deal for people in Shipley – investing in care, protecting our NHS, growing our local economy and protecting our greenbelt. We will deliver a fairer future for all.”

“The local Green Party has stepped up, just as the Liberal Democrats have done in Brighton, because they know how much is at stake. Philip Davies has brought shame on Shipley, while his government is destroying public services, privatising the NHS and attacking hard working families. Parties working in progressive alliance offer the best chance we have of making this election count,” she added.

Matt Edwards, Campaign Coordinator for the Green Party in Bradford District, explained: “We have been convinced that Sophie is a candidate that the other progressive parties in Shipley should unite behind. People have been crying out for a new kind of politics where the left-leaning parties work together to achieve their common goals, rather than attack each other over their differences.”

The announcement follows remarkable events in Brighton last night where Liberal Democrats stood aside in Brighton Pavilion and the Greens stood aside in Brighton Kemptown.

Caroline Lucas said: “I’m delighted to endorse Sophie in Shipley. Under the Conservative government – the one Mr Davies has supported – we have seen the biggest rise in inequality since Margaret Thatcher was Prime Minister. Sophie and I are both committed to tackling that – from reversing the cuts that have left women behind and ending the gender pay gap, to increasing women’s representation in parliament and in business. Sophie has pledged to stand on an agenda that many Green Party members and supporters will agree with and I  look forward to her playing an active role in my campaigns to undo the privatisation of our NHS and for a fairer voter system.”

“The creativity we are seeing in politics across the UK is truly exciting,” said Walker. “I urge the local Labour Party and Liberal Democrats in Shipley to join us in doing things differently. Everyone I have met on the campaign trail in Shipley is calling for a unity candidate to oust Philip Davies. This is a real chance to prevent Philip Davies, and his Regressive Alliance with UKIP, being returned to Parliament.”

In the 2015 General Election the combined vote share of the Green Party, Lib Dems and Labour in Shipley was 40 per cent and the Green Party almost doubled its vote share. The Labour Party hasn’t won the seat in sixteen years and polled 31 per cent in the last election.

Editor’s notes

The Women’s Equality Party was established two years ago to highlight and dismantle obstacles to gender equality in the UK: a political and economic architecture rigged against women and diversity, an education system riven with unconscious bias and gender stereotyping, a media that reinforces these stereotypes, a society that assigns little value to caregiving and therefore assumes it to be women’s business, that underpays women and invests less in women’s health and permits endemic harassment and violence against women.

In May 2016 the party won 350,000 votes in elections across Scotland, Wales and London. It is currently contesting the Liverpool Metro Mayor election and local elections in Sheffield, Tunbridge Wells, South Wales and Worcester.

The Party currently has 65,000 members and registered supporters. It aims to put equality for women at the top of the national political agenda by being an electoral force that also works with other political parties; in addition to party membership it also offers joint memberships to members of other political parties.

Press enquiries to Catherine Riley, Head of Communications (catherine.riley@womensequality.org.uk/ +447764 752 731).

Press at Women’s Equality Party

http://www.womensequality.org.uk/